the TUDOR TUTOR

Your cheeky guide to the dynasty

Archive for Uncategorized

past / future

8CBD0214-8F02-4FFF-9622-530F180BDF61While my usual topic of conversation is history, today I would like to look forward, instead of backward.

In honour Of Earth Day, I would love to encourage you to do whatever you can to protect the future of our planet, in whatever way you are called. You may be the go-to neighbor for organising local clean-up events. Perhaps you ensure that your household is fastidious about recycling. You may be that coworker who is a terrific example to others, with your BPA-free reusable water bottle. Or maybe you have a passion for educating others on keeping our oceans clean for marine life!

As far as the past, English history is especially close to my heart (as you know!). My affinity for the Tudors is no secret. I also adore reading about anything that falls under “medieval,” Marie Antoinette, and the general history of the British monarchy.

When I set my sights on the future of our earth, my special love is protecting pollinators. And to narrow that down even more, I’m wild about raising native (solitary) bees. They are gentle (no stinging!), extremely effective pollinators, easy to raise, and – let’s be honest – they are absolutely adorable.

See that pic above? That’s one of my sweet little leafcutter bees from last summer, practically smiling for the camera! I’m currently working with my mason bees, lovely little cuties that will fly in mild spring temperatures to pollinate the fruit trees that pop up this time of year.

For more information on keeping these hard-working and darling critters, check out the website of Crown Bees. I get most of my materials from them and they have loads of good info.

Whatever you do to love and preserve our earth, keep doing it. Do it with fervor and with the generosity to encourage others. Many of us thrive on learning about our past, but we cannot ignore our future.

Advertisements

#royalwedding 3CCF4925-B7DE-4532-949F-8FC10AFEDDAD

Merry Christmas and Happy 2018!

5BEEBEDB-B899-44B7-885F-D982AB34D7CAHello, all! Thank you for all your support in 2017. I greatly appreciate all of you who have bought / read / borrowed / shared my book, and who have kept up with my accounts on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. I hope you have a beautiful and peaceful holiday season, and a very happy New Year!

Let’s Try This Again…

IMG_5755.PNG

You may remember that, over a year ago, I announced that I would be closing my Facebook page due to a number of reasons. 

Recently I thought I would try to bring the page back, so if you are so inclined, please come on over. 😊

 

I Never Ask for Anything, but…

imageHello all!
May I please ask a favour of you today?
If you have read my little book, The Tudor Tutor: Your Cheeky Guide to the Dynasty, would you take a few moments to head over to Amazon or to goodreads and jot a few words?
It would be so very appreciated! THANK YOU!!

Your Gift Problems, Solved!

TTgift

What history fanatic wouldn’t love a history book as a gift? Here’s an idea! 😉

I’m Barb, and I Support Cursive Handwriting Education

TTcursive

I shared the above photo I created on all my social media channels yesterday (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest), with the following caption:

“Learning cursive (joined-up writing or handwriting in the UK) is on the decline in the States, due to the implentation of the Common Core Standards in most states, as well as the erroneous belief that cursive writing is useless and antiquated in the modern world.

On the contrary: Research has shown that cursive writing improves brain development, hones fine motor skills, sharpens categorisation skills, and teaches the brain to integrate visual and tactile information.

Without cursive training, kids won’t be able to read historic documents (let alone communication from older relatives!), won’t be able to take notes efficiently, won’t even know the joy of enjoying a hand-written card. I teach my own kids cursive at home, and feel strongly that it should be implanted in the school curriculum once again.”

The feedback has been tremendous! I wanted to approach some concerns that came up, especially on the thread on my Facebook page and on pages where it has been shared, so here we go…

“Sure they can read historic documents…There are text versions.”

This is like saying “Why learn a foreign language when there’s Google Translate?”

“You mean historicAL.”

I mean both! This holds for historic documents such as the Declaration of Independence, and also for historical documents. For example, last weekend our family visited Culpeper, Virginia, which holds quite a bit of US Civil War era history. In the town’s museum, our 12-year-old daughter was able to read a 19th-century letter from a soldier to one of his relatives, describing the conditions in the area and events happening at the time.

“Reading historic documents just isn’t that important for most kids/people.”

That’s why I mentioned not being able to read communication from people who do write in cursive, not to mention the many other educational benefits listed in the original caption (above).

“It has nothing to do with Common Core.”

To restate the first paragraph of the original caption, “”Learning cursive (joined-up writing or handwriting in the UK) is on the decline in the States, due to the implentation of the Common Core Standards in most states, as well as the erroneous belief that cursive writing is useless and antiquated in the modern world.” While cursive writing may have been pushed aside in some places before Common Core came about (and yes, CC does not mention cursive at all: that’s precisely why it’s not considered a part of the CC curriculum), at least eight CC states to date have made cursive mandatory in schools, including California, Massachusetts, and North Carolina.

“You’ve misspelled ‘handwriting;’ there’s no ‘u’ in it.”

Oh my goodness, enough of this. The flow between my w and r may render the distinction fuzzy. However, rest assured that I know how to spell it and that the w is the letter that’s there.

ALSO!…

*There are some fantastic articles to be found, making the case for cursive. Check out the following articles:

What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades – The New York Times

5 Reasons Cursive Writing Should Be Taught in School – Concordia Online

Brain Research and Cursive Writing – David Sortino

* While, as an educator, I much prefer manipulatives to digital educational enhancements, I don’t mind sharing these apps which can add to a child’s learning of cursive writing: Cursive Writing Wizard by L’escapadou, Intro to Cursive by Montessorium, Cursive Writing by Horizon Business Inc, and Zaner-Bloser Handwriting by Zaner-Bloser Inc.

* To see wonderful examples of Tudor signatures, please see this board on my Pinterest page.